RURAL ROOTS: Home Grown is all about cultivating connections and nurturing relationships—between people, people and animals, people and places. The exhibition features works by artists Michele Campbell, Huguette LaCroix Gauthier, Autumn Robbie-Draward and Lori Zébière, who gather abundant inspiration from their Eastman Region home based studios. Each artist reflects on contemporary rural life in her own diverse way through a variety of mediums, exploring themes such as family traditions, personal narratives and iconic prairie symbolism.

  Lori Zebiere (she/her) is a Canadian born multimedia artist creating from her home-studio based in the Eastman Region of Manitoba a few miles outside of the small village of Garson on Treaty 1 Territory.

Throughout the pandemic Lori has continued to fuel her inspiration by taking remote learning studio courses through the University of Manitoba’s School of Art. The lockdowns, stay-home & code red orders have provided ample time for quiet introspection and self-reflection on her home, the land on which she lives and what immediately surrounds her.  Lori has begun experimenting with installation works, alternative photography techniques and sculpture along side her more familiar mediums of graphite, ink and paint to explore her impact on and relationships with–animals, plants and the land itself.

 

 

Unknowingly, Autumn Robbie Draward has been nurturing her creativity throughout her life. Drawing early on, then writing and performing in school plays. Later, sewing, gardening and photographing her world while pursuing a wordsmithing career. Her awakening came with her first painting class with Victoria Beach artist and teacher, Nancy-Lou Ateah. Her creativity now is fashioned from the values that she has embraced to guide her every day living: community, connection, love and joy. Currently, she is creating art under the mentorship of Milos Milidrag. In 2015, her piece, “Lost”, won First Place in the mixed media category and Best in Show for the Eastman Regional Judged Art Exhibition and received an honourable mention the following year at the Manitoba Rural Art Exhibition. Her art hangs in personal collections across Canada. Autumn lives on the banks of the Brokenhead River in Lydiatt, Manitoba with her husband and pride of cats.

 

Michele Campbell was born and raised in Manitoba, and currently resides with her husband and two dogs in Beausejour. Working full time and raising three children, Michele would always find the time to do art. Michele was self-taught until she was 34 years old, when she began taking lessons from artists including Nancy Lou Ateah, Andrew Giffin and, most recently, Milos Milidrag.

While growing up in the Interlake area, she learnt of Clarence Tillenius, an artist and advocate for wildlife and wilderness. She believes this is where her passion for painting animals stemmed from. When Michele was four and living with her grandparents in the town of Inwood, her Sunday School teacher visited her grandparents to inform them she felt Michele was a talented young girl. She brought paper, pencils and crayons to encourage Michele to draw.

Michele has been accepted into many juried art shows, as well has been accepted into the Manitoba Society for Artists. She has offered art lessons, and sold her art across Canada. She has also done many commissions for friends and family, among others.

Huguette LaCroix Gauthier expresses herself artistically using glass as her medium of choice. Soon after learning the traditional methods of creating stained glass, her work developed over the years to include painting on glass, and eventually to the fusing of glass. Her combination of glass paints and fused glass provides the opportunity to create some unique art pieces. Forever pushing the medium to higher levels by experimentation, she is often adding to her little box of tricks. Her glass art ranges from transparent window pieces to wall art, and to the three-dimensional form. The natural world is her inspiration.